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Governor Inslee released a list of things that will open up in Washington State on June 30th.

Cruise ships was not on the list.  It only allows ships carrying up to 250 passengers.

Until he changes his position, there will be no Alaska Cruises from Seattle.

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11 minutes ago, TXcruzer said:

Governor Inslee released a list of things that will open up in Washington State on June 30th.

Cruise ships was not on the list.  It only allows ships carrying up to 250 passengers.

Until he changes his position, there will be no Alaska Cruises from Seattle.

Isn't that merely mirroring CDC cruise ship guidance though?

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I'm not a resident of the state of Washington but confusion about what mitigation measures apply and which don't is typical. 

Its important to distinguish between pandemic related CDC recommendations for PH authorities at the state level - none of these are mandatory - and CDC recommendations for the cruise lines that have become mandatory and enforceable regulations via U.S.C. 42.

CDC recommendations for various mitigation measures become enforceable mandates or they don't by virtue of how state and county officials promulgate them. Every state, and even every county's level of enforceability is different albeit there may be similarities.

There has never been a national mandate for any pandemic related mitigation measure in the US outside of the cruise lines.  That is atypical as most countries have national plans. It is what it is in the US because of the principals of Federalism and state's rights in the US Constitution. There are advantages and disadvantages to both national plans and Federalism that produces a patchwork - some will say more regionally tailored - approach.    

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12 hours ago, twangster said:

Some small US flagged cruise lines have resumed service.  That was April IIRC, at least in Florida.  

Ships too small for the CSO to apply.

If the author can't even get the CSO timeline right, I doubt there's any knowledge of <250 passenger sailings happening

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11 minutes ago, smokeybandit said:

If the author can't even get the CSO timeline right, I doubt there's any knowledge of <250 passenger sailings happening

I believe she was referring to the October 2020 elimination of the NSO and introduction of the CSO.  IIRC we all were duped into thinking that was a relaxation of the rules.

 

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14 hours ago, SpeedNoodles said:

DId this reporter take a marijuana?

"The CDC relaxed its rules on cruising in October — too late to rescue 2020’s Alaska cruise season, which generally runs from May until September. But cruising has slowly resumed in places like Florida and Southern California. "

Wait...WHAT???

https://www.seattletimes.com/business/senate-passes-bill-to-lift-restrictions-on-seattle-to-alaska-cruises/?utm_source=marketingcloud&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=TSA_051421034317+Seattle-to-Alaska+cruises+inch+closer+to+restarting_5_13_2021&utm_term=Active subscriber

 

Sloppy!  Demonstrates the laziness an/or ignorance of those working for information outlets. 

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The errors in the subject article - Senate passes bill to lift restrictions on Seattle-to-Alaska cruises - are more errors of definition and completeness than they are of errors in content. That's how I read it. Its the headline and article content that are good representations of the level of misleading or ignorant of the facts reporting that we'll be seeing in news reports going forward as the pandemic impact fades.

The article implies (Picture of NCL large cruise ship with Seattle sky line in the background) but does not state that large size cruise ships will be sailing next Monday from the Port of Seattle as a result of MurKowski's bill. The average Joe on the street does not understand nor does he care about the complexities of cruise ships restarting Alaska sailings from Seattle. This article implies a restart is imminent.  

You have to read the entire article carefully AND have followed this cruise line mess closely to understand what's going on with the Murkowski bill and how it fits into the many actions that are currently, or will be in the immediate future, impactful on a restart of cruise ship sailings from US ports. I don' t have a problem with the article but that's because I know what's going on.

These are the only statements in the article that what I would consider erroneous in content: 

"Critics have argued that cruise lines register their ships outside the United States to avoid paying federal taxes."

"Foreign-flagged vessels are also not required to adhere to American labor and safety rules, environmental laws and other regulations."

Do cruise lines pay federal taxes? They do but the rate cruise lines pay is considerably less than the going rate. That's because of complex taxing agreements dating back to the early 1900s between the US and certain countries that trade regularly between each other ..... we won't tax your shipping company if you don't tax ours. They also pay state taxes and typically, a per head tax to ports at which they are making a call. A mega-cruise calling on 7 ports in a 10 day itinerary will be up to $50K per port call. That's close to a cool 1/2 million in fees ..... and that's for ONE cruise. Ask again why the taxes and port fees that appear on your invoice are part of the cost of your cruise.  The last sentence in the article is just wrong on a number of levels. Is RCL, a company whose ships are registered and flagged in Liberia, exempt from complying with the CSO? The Vessel Sanitation Program? Uhhh, No.

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36 minutes ago, Baked Alaska said:

Are there any other ports Radiance could start or end besides Seattle if Vancouver is out (assuming they would still go with the open-jaw sailing)?

The bill that passed the senate specifically identifies Washington state.  

I'm not sure of another deep water port suitable for cruise ships in the state.

Astoria, Oregon is close by relative measures but a rather technical port to sail in and out of and being in a different state takes it off the list even if it somehow made it on a list given it's other technical challenges.  

Nothing jumps out as an alternative to Seattle.

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Here's where we are with Congress and the Alaska Tourism Restoration Act

image.png.59c478d8a987c90762ff387b46581c30.png

image.thumb.png.350ff0cfe5927cd5e7bb56469eea9c31.png

Now, what does "Held at the desk" mean? 

image.thumb.png.dcb2a5271186a920c8bda43e1bdf3833.png

In English, that means the bill was requested by the Representative who introduced the Bill (Don Young of Alaska) to be held, so it could be considered by the whole House of Representatives (as opposed to being shuttled off to a committee) and passed by Unanimous Consent (Similar to the Senate, there is no vote, it just wasn't objected to). 

There is currently no indication of when Representative Young will request Unanimous Consent for this Bill. I am guessing he is probably checking with his colleagues to make sure no one WILL object. (An objection, by anyone of the 435 members, ends this request for Unanimous Consent, but it will also provide an opportunity, as we saw in the Senate, to resolve whatever differences are there and then make another request for unanimous consent.)

If passed, it will go to President Biden within a week or so for his signature. But the passage of the bill will more than likely be enough for the cruise lines/CLIA to get ready for a late Alaska 2021 season, as I don't see the President vetoing this.

THEN it'll be back seeing what happens with the CDC. (womp womp)

Personally, I am hopeful, 60/40 it'll pass on the 1st attempt.

For those who want to keep track of this themselves, 

Actions - S.593 - 117th Congress (2021-2022): Alaska Tourism Restoration Act | Congress.gov | Library of Congress 

If nothing comes up, just search congress.gov for the Alaska Tourism Restoration Act or S.593

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Better hope that they extend that work around if you want to cruise in 2022 to Alaska...I highly doubt it will be business as usual here by then.

 

75% of population doubled dosed to remove restrictions here is the current political garbage they are feeding us. I would bet AGAINST ever reaching those #'s in Canada....

 

I predict that masks will be here for ever based on current government speak and mandates. We are currently locked down and not even able to visit dying family in our own country......we are at 50% one dose and 3% second dose and vaccines have been out for almost 6 months.,...

 

Just saying...

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7 minutes ago, smokeybandit said:

I'm pondering an Alaskan cruise next May/June 2022. But really hesitate to book one out of Vancouver for that reason

Book it and let RCG cancel it or revise it with a date change and/or starting/ending port change. We're set to cruise from Seward to Vancouver (popular excursions already purchase, too). I'm hoping they can figure it out and move debark to Seattle. I'm holding off on airfare until next year (kills me to do it, though).

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Just speculation but Norwegian knew this bill was going to pass days before it actually did. The cruise lines know stuff we don't. I suspect that applies to the status of the CSO. Lots of things happening this week.

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