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I'll never stay in a ________________ cabin again!


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12 minutes ago, Pooch said:

Suite snobs here.  We tried a deluxe balcony cabin but it was too small and don’t get me started on the space capsule shower.  And what the heck is the 3 in 1 stuff that comes out of the shower dispenser.  You want me to wash my hair with soap?  You want me to wash my body with shampoo?  On purpose???  
we have a JS booked on Explorer next October and seriously considering upgrading.  Just not sure the JS will be big enough.

Stand in the shower and have someone flush the toilet and it will seem like you are launching into space. lol

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4 hours ago, twangster said:

Connecting cabin.  

I don't want to hear about my neighbors day or plans for the evening.   

I'm with you on this one, it is something we always check on making sure the cabin selected is not connecting.

I even dislike hotel room that are connecting, so much so that if at of my preferred brands, I will make a trip back down to the desk to ask them to change it.

 

All this is unless I'm traveling with a party and we require them, and that's probably only with the kids or grandkids.

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I have only stayed in an inside cabin once as an 11 year old on Sovereign and decided right then it was not for me!

On my other 3 cruises I have stayed in a junior suite (called Signature on HAL) and now you all have me nervous that my next 3 in a row in an ocean view balcony are going to be too cramped! This shower sounds awful, how did I not take the tiny bathroom into account?! 

We'll see if I turn into a "JS and above" person after our S2S November 3rd-12.

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26 minutes ago, Fairlynew said:

I really would like to try a Central Park or boardwalk balcony because I love to people watch but I hate the tube showers 

I don't know if I could ever stay in a Central park or Boardwalk balcony room because I feel like with the curtains open everyone can partially see into your room.  I've seen some stuff while walking that I was like people need to close their curtains if they are going to partake in certain activities or walk around in the nude.

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I echo the inside cabins for the reasons stated, AND the connecting cabins. We did a balcony guarantee once, and it had a connecting cabin. We heard the man in the next cabin talking loudly on his phone about his casino game plan with someone on embarkation day. Thankfully, he must have spent the entire cruise in the casino because we never heard him again after that loud hour-long conversation. ? 

Never again.

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11 hours ago, twangster said:

It can?  

OH MY! July 25, 2019, roughest seas for whatever reason. The Captain came over the PA and apologized. Sick sacks were everywhere, and the crew offered meclizine like candy. (Side note: remember when the sick sacks on airlines also doubled as film developing envelopes? That always made me laugh. We mainly flew TWA and Eastern Airlines when I was a child.) We were in the sushi making class at Izumi. Everyone was green. Half the class had to leave. I had taken some meclizine prior, so I was wiped out but enjoying my sushi nonetheless. It was not a good day sailing the inside passage. ?

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My very first cruise was in an interior cabin.  I wouldn't say I'll never do that again, but I'd prefer not to.  

One cabin I will say I would never book again is a cabin directly beneath Adventure Ocean -- there were constantly stomping noises coming from above.  

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I have a Promenade interior for my next cruise.  I don't know if I could do a regular interior, but the window to the Promenade makes it more do-able.  I don't spend enough time in my room that it really makes much of a difference. Would I rather have a balcony?  Heck ya, but sailin' solo I've got to cut some corners.

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7 hours ago, Pooch said:

It’s a slippery slope!!

True that! So hard to revert back but no disrespect to those who just want on the ship at the lowest price because I was that guy at a time in my life. Now JS is the minimum for us but I do not advise skipping steps, let guaranteed resources dictate it.

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Interior is great when on a budget or in situations where you wouldn't otherwise take the cruise.  

Bucket list destinations often come with mega sized cruise fares.  For destination like Alaska interior is smart if it means you can put all those savings into excursions.  I would much rather put the $2k per person savings into over the top excursions because that is how you experience Alaska.  If you have $8k to put into an Alaska cruise with great excursions then great, do a balcony.  Instead of delaying an Alaska cruise until you can save up $8k go in an interior and do the same over the top excursions for $4k, then once you have saved up another $4k do it again another year.  Go twice and you'll experience a completely different Alaska.  Once you are in a helicopter or standing on a glacier with sled dogs the type of cabin you booked is irrelevant.   Same with a Panama Canal cruise.  

So if the choice is to cruise or wait to save up more money, I choose to cruise.  

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Really no inside cabins??  Ok back in 1978 we had an outside porthole view and it was tiny compared to our inside cabin on our 2019 Allure cruise.

We had a promenade view on Indy and that was ok but a very noisy at night with all the partying going on.

We have a GTTY for Symphony coming up, then Jr. suite, then a balcony, so we are testing the rooms to see what we like best.

However, we had no problems with the value of an inside cabin that we could select on an Oasis class ship.

We are very light sleepers and my wife sleeps with an eye mask and ear plugs, so a cave is perfect for sleeping.

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12 hours ago, Baked Alaska said:

OH MY! July 25, 2019, roughest seas for whatever reason. The Captain came over the PA and apologized. Sick sacks were everywhere, and the crew offered meclizine like candy. (Side note: remember when the sick sacks on airlines also doubled as film developing envelopes? That always made me laugh. We mainly flew TWA and Eastern Airlines when I was a child.) We were in the sushi making class at Izumi. Everyone was green. Half the class had to leave. I had taken some meclizine prior, so I was wiped out but enjoying my sushi nonetheless. It was not a good day sailing the inside passage. ?

I've sailed the Inside Passage of Alaska three times now - we always have one night that's questionable (where sea sick bags get pulled out) and it's always between Vancouver Island and the actual passage - where the ship is more out in open sea.  I've always experienced very calm waters when actually in the protection of the passage.  (and to keep with the theme of the thread - Inside Rooms make me sleep too much of Alaska away, and I can't watch seals on ice floes whenever I want from an inside room.

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I'll echo connecting cabins.

Unless I'm traveling with someone or planning on working for a few days, a balcony is wasted on me and I sleep better in an interior and like the excuse to spend as little time there as possible.  Just don't make me hear my neighbors. I'd rather be next to and across from crew areas than that.

That might change once I venture out of the Caribbean for some of my upcoming ones in Alaska/Australia/New Zealand (assuming they go), but we'll see.

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I will also never book another full suite on a Vision class ship that is all the way forward.  We spent 2 weeks on Grandeur a few years ago right underneath the WJ. Almost all of the full suites on V Class ships are jammed up from under the jammer.  It was loud at all hours.

We are booked on Vision out of PR in late October but we are in one of the 2 BR GS near the rear elevators.  Hopefully that will be a different experience.

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Cabin all the way forward or aft on lowest decks. (Or any deck for the walking distance.)

Anchor noise, docking noise, and stabilizer noise.

Fairly sure a stabilizer was broken on one cruise, middle of the night you'd hear a loud SLAM like something metal smashing into the side of the ship. It would wake you up and you'd have to deal with trying to sleep over the sound of it doing this slamming noise randomly all night long. ?

Or a cabin below the pool deck/buffet restaurant. Deck chair noise at all hours of the night while crew stacks/unstacks them or drag them across the deck.

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21 hours ago, 0_0 said:

Cabin all the way forward or aft on lowest decks. (Or any deck for the walking distance.)

Anchor noise, docking noise, and stabilizer noise.

Fairly sure a stabilizer was broken on one cruise, middle of the night you'd hear a loud SLAM like something metal smashing into the side of the ship. It would wake you up and you'd have to deal with trying to sleep over the sound of it doing this slamming noise randomly all night long. ?

Or a cabin below the pool deck/buffet restaurant. Deck chair noise at all hours of the night while crew stacks/unstacks them or drag them across the deck.

The chair noise made us book suites on any deck but the one immediately below the pool/windjammer deck forevermore. Moving chairs over nonslip surfaces is noisy in a way that transmits well through a steel overhead. 

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