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Here it is! Healthy Sail Recommendations


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5 hours ago, mook1525 said:
  • Passengers should be tested for COVID-19 between five days and 24 hours prior to boarding and share a negative result with the cruise operator. 
  • At embarkation passengers should undergo an additional health screening. 
  • Crew members should be tested between five days and 24 hours before leaving their home. After receiving a negative result, they should quarantine on board for seven days and take another test before beginning duties with a negative result.
  • Passengers and crew should undergo a daily temperature check.
  • Passengers and crew should wear a face mask or cloth covering in accordance with CDC guidelines. 
  • Ships should have lowered crew and passenger loads.
  • Cruise lines should implement shorter sailing itineraries.
  • Cruise operators should also implement contact-free check-in. 
  • Increased sanitation on board and in ports should be implemented with attention paid to both low-touch and high-touch areas.

 

 

 

 

What will happen to pools and hot tubs?

Its what was expected.  Looked over some of the CDC survey inputs and they look very close to those also.

 

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These recommendations are totally incomplete. No mention at all was made whether hiding rubber ducks would be allowed.

I'm confused why you would consider this?  Does a grocery store fear healthcare workers?  Does an airline question healthcare workers or pull them aside at check in?  How does anyone even know what yo

The requirement to book cruise line excursions is not unexpected and understandable given the need to maintain the "bubble" as much as possible from start to finish.   The comment that they shoul

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29 minutes ago, Marlena said:

I'm wondering how healthcare workers will be treated at embarkation. Immediately brought for extra testing? Grilled a bit more??? Thats me AND my husband so that fact wotries me.

That's easy, PRIORITY BOARDING as well as a few cocktails on RCCL to start, thank the heavens for Healthcare workers and First Responders. You should be shown immediate gratitude, thanks you so much for what you do! Cheers to YOU!!

 

happy hour cheers GIF by Pepsi #Summergram

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47 minutes ago, Marlena said:

I'm wondering how healthcare workers will be treated at embarkation. Immediately brought for extra testing? Grilled a bit more??? Thats me AND my husband so that fact wotries me.

I'm confused why you would consider this?  Does a grocery store fear healthcare workers?  Does an airline question healthcare workers or pull them aside at check in?  How does anyone even know what your profession is? 

I would think they all would be happy to welcome healthcare workers.  Healthcare workers know to follow guidelines, they are probably the ideal guest.  Heroes need vacations too.  However I don't think they'll even know if someone is a healthcare worker.  

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47 minutes ago, twangster said:

I'm confused why you would consider this?  Does a grocery store fear healthcare workers?  Does an airline question healthcare workers or pull them aside at check in?  How does anyone even know what your profession is? 

I would think they all would be happy to welcome healthcare workers.  Healthcare workers know to follow guidelines, they are probably the ideal guest.  Heroes need vacations too.  However I don't think they'll even know if someone is a healthcare worker.  

you would think. However people I know have been asked to leave pharmacies, refused service at banks etc.  And we can't refuse to take care of covid pts for 2 weeks before. So in theory we would have to say there has been possible exposure. 

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1 hour ago, Neesa said:

**I'm trying to figure out how to glue on those dastardly fake long eyelashes so I can smile more with my eye's

LMAO.  We were told to SMILE with our eyes when dealing with customers.  I never thought about fake eye lashes!  I work for a men's retailer.  I am the only female in the store.  I can see it now...Pima, can you put on mascara/false eyelashes for me so I can smile?

Back on topic.

One additional thought.     

My Symphony cruise in May looks pretty full.  I tried to do a fake booking for balconies, including the neighborhoods, and they are 95% gone, basically 1 or 2 on every deck.  So how will they limit the capacity?  Should I now be waiting for RCL to say, due to lower capacity, we are canceling your reservation?  How are they going to pick and choose if they have to cancel reservations to reduce the load?  Date reserved?  C& A level?  Cabin level?  $$$ you have spent on excursions (IE, we have purchased the thermal pass, spa couples massage, coco cay beach club day pass, cabana at Labadee, and excursions via RCL at every port, plus UDP, DBP and Voom)?   

 

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27 minutes ago, Marlena said:

If they ask possible exposure. Donyou lie and say no? So many patients are " possible" exposure.

I think if you look at it from that perspective, then every time you step out of your house, with so many asymptomatic carriers out there, you have had "possible exposure", health care worker or non-health care worker.  

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2 hours ago, Pima1988 said:

I am one of those retailers.  I have to play mask police everyday.  I have had customers argue with me, telling me it is not a law or mandate.  The only thing I can say is, that for our company we require everyone to wear a mask.  IMPO that is exactly what RCL is saying.  It is their company and they can set regulations regarding health and safety.

The problem that does occur in the retail world and I suspect will happen on the ships is: You become use to everyone wearing a mask, thus, you look at their eyes only.  Eventually, there will be someone that doesn't wear it and it will take quite sometime before you realize OMG they don't have a mask on.  That is when the ire comes out from the customer whom you ask to place on a mask.  They will eventually says it is not a law.  In turn, our response is:  Yes, but our company has made it a requirement.

I don't get the argument regarding the mask.  In VA there is not one place you can go to without a sign saying NO MASK = NO ENTRY.

I am so tired of people acting like they are Mel Gibson in The Patriot over wearing a mask while grocery shopping.

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1 hour ago, Pima1988 said:

One additional thought.     

My Symphony cruise in May looks pretty full.  I tried to do a fake booking for balconies, including the neighborhoods, and they are 95% gone, basically 1 or 2 on every deck.  So how will they limit the capacity?  Should I now be waiting for RCL to say, due to lower capacity, we are canceling your reservation?  How are they going to pick and choose if they have to cancel reservations to reduce the load?  Date reserved?  C& A level?  Cabin level?  $$$ you have spent on excursions (IE, we have purchased the thermal pass, spa couples massage, coco cay beach club day pass, cabana at Labadee, and excursions via RCL at every port, plus UDP, DBP and Voom)?   

 

Maybe it’s already limited. Cabins showing as not available (Sold) may have been taken off the market and will remain empty. 

Lift and Shift may have taken care of a lot of reservations. 

What date are you? We’re May 29. 

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Fascinating chart on pages 9-15 of the things they plan to keep long-term vs. the things that can be scaled back as conditions improve.

For example, ship or "verified" excursions is only for "the initial return to sailing" but better air filters and some changes to the medical facilities are intended to be permanent.

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3 hours ago, Neesa said:

That's easy, PRIORITY BOARDING as well as a few cocktails on RCCL to start, thank the heavens for Healthcare workers and First Responders. You should be shown immediate gratitude, thanks you so much for what you do! Cheers to YOU!!

 

happy hour cheers GIF by Pepsi #Summergram

Or you could be asked to augment the medical staff 😉

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14 hours ago, Jill said:

Lift and Shift may have taken care of a lot of reservations. 

What date are you? We’re May 29.

We are the 15th. 

It was actually showing that way months ago.  We upgraded back in end of May/early June and got the 2nd to last available on our deck.  I than went on in July and looked to see what was available for any balcony cabin type and I was seeing maybe 1 or 2 per deck, that was probably in early August.  I agree that I think a lot has to do with L&S.  Yes, maybe they have already removed the remaining, but it was looking pretty full (90%) back 2 months ago.  Thus, my question is still even if they want to get to a 75% load, they have to kick some of us off the ship for our sailing.

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16 hours ago, Lovetocruise2002 said:

I think if you look at it from that perspective, then every time you step out of your house, with so many asymptomatic carriers out there, you have had "possible exposure", health care worker or non-health care worker.  

I agree. 

As I have stated I work for a national retailer.  Outside our door is a big sign and it states "Are you feeling well?  If not we ask you to use our curbside delivery" You cannot miss it as you open the door to enter our store.   Do you think I actually believe 100% of our customers would be honest regarding that question?  Absolutely not, and we are not talking about a vacation that have paid for at least 90 days ago.

 

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17 hours ago, Marlena said:

However people I know have been asked to leave pharmacies, refused service at banks etc.  And we can't refuse to take care of covid pts for 2 weeks before.

That is strange to me.  How would the pharmacist or the bank teller know?  I work retail (specialty) I know many of my customers personally, but someone coming in off the street I would not know if they were a nurse/doc, etc.  I have no need to ask, thus, I cannot fathom why the bank teller or the pharmacist would ask since it has nothing to do with the transaction.

Honestly, as I said to @Lovetocruise2002 in that theory, they should keep me off the ship since I have a high risk of exposure.  That bank teller is probably at a higher risk than you.  Think about it, money is not sanitary.  I have to visit the bank to make deposits for the store.  They are not wearing gloves when they do it.  In that theory, they better list a "NO SAIL" order for careers all over the place.   IE my DS works as a Bio Chemist, and deals with blood products.  He could be infected.  My DD is a school teacher.  My other DS is a pilot.  So, just in my family I would have 4 out of 5 that would be considered high risk.

OBTW, thank you and your husband for being there for all of us.  It is a calling, and unfortunately people forget the personal sacrifices that you make.

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The 5 days to 24 hours previous COVID test is my only concern, do the 5 days include weekend days? A rapid test has various turn around times, what if you are sailing on Monday? Do you get tested the previous Wednesday and hope the results are back in hand to take to the port on Monday? 

I don't see the testing centers being to happy about testing "cruisers" I researched previously and unless you tell a fib and say you feel sick or may have been exposed will they test? Seriously I think this could be a possible sticking point and depending where the test is inside vs drive thru are we exposing ourselves to other illness like the flu etc!

Yikes, I love everything else stipulated as it all makes sense, this one not so much.

If you test negative but then are exposed within the 5 day timeframe (maybe not even know it) was that just an exercise in futility? We are being tested and screened at the Port before being allowed to embark, if we must test before hand at least allow 7 days be the benchmark to account for the weekend days?

Any thoughts? Just thinking out loud about this hurdle on my end, even before COVID we pretty much self isolated for 2 weeks previous any sailing so as not to pick up a bug to bring and share on board, no extra activities for the ultimate enjoyment of our sailing, things are finally looking up! Let's do this!

Sick Black And White GIF by Fleischer Studios

 

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2 hours ago, Neesa said:

If you test negative but then are exposed within the 5 day timeframe (maybe not even know it) was that just an exercise in futility?

It's definitely not an exercise in futility. Since a person can be infected with the virus for up to 10 days before they start showing symptoms, this is going to be a critical means of finding asymptomatic passengers and making sure they don't board the ship when they have a chance to be super-spreaders.

Yes, you can absolutely be exposed without knowing it inside the 5-day window, or get back a negative test because you were infected just a day or two before you took it and had too little to show up. And this is where all of the boarding and on-board protocols come into play, working as a series of defensive barriers to reduce (but not 100% eliminate) the risk of spread during the trip.

Regarding your original question of whether weekend days count, I'm not really sure. It likely depends on the lab the test is sent to: how well-staffed is it? Are they currently working to process tests on weekends? Is the place that took the test sending the specimens by same-day / next-day courier?

When my daughter went for a test after learning she might have been exposed, the test was given on a Saturday night close to 11 PM. She had her results that Monday afternoon, less than 48 hours later. Had she gotten the test Friday night instead of Saturday, I'm guessing that she still would not have had her results until Monday.

For the folks who have noted before that she might have gotten super-expedited results because of the confirmed exposure risk, her roommate is getting tested weekly or maybe bi-weekly because he works on the college campus in the admissions office. He's getting his results back pretty consistently inside 48 hours.

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59 minutes ago, JLMoran said:

It's definitely not an exercise in futility. Since a person can be infected with the virus for up to 10 days before they start showing symptoms, this is going to be a critical means of finding asymptomatic passengers and making sure they don't board the ship when they have a chance to be super-spreaders.

Yes, you can absolutely be exposed without knowing it inside the 5-day window, or get back a negative test because you were infected just a day or two before you took it and had too little to show up. And this is where all of the boarding and on-board protocols come into play, working as a series of defensive barriers to reduce (but not 100% eliminate) the risk of spread during the trip.

Regarding your original question of whether weekend days count, I'm not really sure. It likely depends on the lab the test is sent to: how well-staffed is it? Are they currently working to process tests on weekends? Is the place that took the test sending the specimens by same-day / next-day courier?

When my daughter went for a test after learning she might have been exposed, the test was given on a Saturday night close to 11 PM. She had her results that Monday afternoon, less than 48 hours later. Had she gotten the test Friday night instead of Saturday, I'm guessing that she still would not have had her results until Monday.

For the folks who have noted before that she might have gotten super-expedited results because of the confirmed exposure risk, her roommate is getting tested weekly or maybe bi-weekly because he works on the college campus in the admissions office. He's getting his results back pretty consistently inside 48 hours.

Last week there was an exposure in the accounting department in the plant where my product is produced. My boss and ten others were able to get test results back within fifteen minutes of showing up. 

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The pre-travel test may be inconvenient, but its a way to mitigate travel risk prior the  air or car ride to the port.   I would take the pre-travel test on embarkation (- 4 days)  to mitigate the chance I'm not traveling with it and then get surprised during the embarkation process.  Understand the embarkation day test.   This won''t be a permanent situation, but if you're wanting to get back soonest, you'll have to partake the the extra diligence.  Fill the squares, cooperate and graduate and these things will pass.

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The most important part of the document is on page 52

That agreements must first be reached with countries and ports of call that will allow ships to enter and to disembark crew and passengers that have Covid-19. 

In other words if no caribbean island agrees to allow ships to disembark Covid-19 patients then there will be no caribbean cruises. 

So in reality if no country in the world agrees then there is no cruising 

 

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11 hours ago, cruisellama said:

The pre-travel test may be inconvenient, but its a way to mitigate travel risk prior the  air or car ride to the port.

Agreed. There is no single recommendation that is a "silver bullet" approach.  If there were, all the other recommendations wouldn't be necessary.

The Panel's approach is like a mesh, where all these different changes (masks, testing, social distancing, etc) aren't enough to prevent things on their own, but together, significantly reduce the likelihood of there being a case without it being caught at one point to mitigate the spread.

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4 minutes ago, Matt said:

Agreed. There is no single recommendation that is a "silver bullet" approach.  If there were, all the other recommendations wouldn't be necessary.

The Panel's approach is like a mesh, where all these different changes (masks, testing, social distancing, etc) aren't enough to prevent things on their own, but together, significantly reduce the likelihood of there being a case without it being caught at one point to mitigate the spread.

The panel highlighted that nothing is 100%.   We're now in the stage of risk management/mitigation - lets get to it.  We'll have some success and a few failures - but doing nothing only cedes to defeat.   Even in failures, we learn, and find ways to avoid them next time around.

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@cruisellamaI agree. As an engineer I know that there is only so much planning that you can do. Eventually you have to go ahead and run tests. It never fails, something will not work right, but you fix it and run more tests. Eventually you get it right.

The cruise lines need to plan and implement what they think will work and give it a limited test. Refine what didn't work and test again. Eventually it will be sufficient.

Having said that, the one thing that they cannot do is to lock everyone on board and not let the go if there is a breakout. Doing that at the beginning of this breakout will forever be a black eye on the industry and give reason for critics to call them petri dishes. 

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