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Cruise lines booking to capacity?


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Hi all,

I'm curious about whether anyone has any info on whether royal and presumably other cruise lines are taking bookings to capacity or if they are capping their bookings to a certain percent? 
I’ve booked a Jan 2022 cruise, and it already seems pretty full. So I am wondering if when cruising finally get the go ahead, will it be those that booked are good to go, or if cruise lines are offering bookings to full capacity in the hopes that by the time it resumes or gets to that specific cruise (for later cruises) they will be able to sail with more passengers. Which if they aren’t will require cancelling some bookings. Thoughts or info available? 

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For the initial restart cruises beyond US borders Celebrity has offered some percentages for St. Maarten, starting at 40% and growing slowly up to 60%.

Royal hasn't said anything other than "reduced capacity" so we don't know.  

In the US I don't know if there are any plans to reduce capacity for cruises beyond the Nov. 1 2021 termination of the CDC CSO for US ports.  

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3 hours ago, em.down.the.rabbit.hole said:

I reckon they are booking to full capacity.  If they need to reduce numbers, so far they cancel the entire sailings and "re-debut" the ship.  This is what just happened for Anthem of the Seas out of Southampton,  although they also changed the itineraries as well. 

I really wish they’d give the option to keep your booking if your cruise gets cancelled and the ship is relaunched on different itinerary. I can understand cancelling interior and ocean view, but if you have balcony or suite, I think you should have the option of keeping it. 

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1 hour ago, Jill said:

I really wish they’d give the option to keep your booking if your cruise gets cancelled and the ship is relaunched on different itinerary. I can understand cancelling interior and ocean view, but if you have balcony or suite, I think you should have the option of keeping it. 

I felt the same way when they cancelled my Star Class on Allure from Galveston.  I had a great rate.

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16 hours ago, twangster said:

In the US I don't know if there are any plans to reduce capacity for cruises beyond the Nov. 1 2021 termination of the CDC CSO for US ports.  

I think it's a slippery slope. You need to book to capacity to try and get back on track as far as revenue is concerned, but I feel for the near future, the next year or two, everybody is going to want to be somewhat cautious.  This thing hasn't been fully figured out yet, who knows if and when that will be and nobody is wanting to be the first to have a major setback. That may be the last nail in the coffin of a cruise line.

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On 4/6/2021 at 7:43 PM, Vanessa77 said:

Hi all,

I'm curious about whether anyone has any info on whether royal and presumably other cruise lines are taking bookings to capacity or if they are capping their bookings to a certain percent? 
I’ve booked a Jan 2022 cruise, and it already seems pretty full. So I am wondering if when cruising finally get the go ahead, will it be those that booked are good to go, or if cruise lines are offering bookings to full capacity in the hopes that by the time it resumes or gets to that specific cruise (for later cruises) they will be able to sail with more passengers. Which if they aren’t will require cancelling some bookings. Thoughts or info available? 

I don’t know if anyone would have a definitive answer to this but I’ve thought about it also. Like some others have said, I presume they’re willing to book the ships solid. Not only do they not know what restrictions there will be, but they’re also using these bookings as the only revenue coming in right now. They’d be crazy to limit it.

We had Symphony booked for July. Even if that cruise sails (unlikely in my opinion), I’m willing to bet they could be overbooked already based on a potential capacity restriction. We didn’t want to get canceled or moved, so we chose to move our deposit over to Adventure since it’s as close to a sure thing as you can currently get, but obviously that doesn’t work for everyone.

Just my guess!

 

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9 hours ago, Biff215 said:

, I’m willing to bet they could be overbooked already based on a potential capacity restriction. We didn’t want to get canceled or moved

I have not seen a protocol if ships are booked beyond a regulated or self imposed capacity limit at time or sailing.

I see four logical approaches.

Last in first out- based on date of booking. Last people to book are first canceled. Follow this back in time until under capacity limit.

Lowest revenue rooms cancelled. Likely inside and ocean view. Benefit in case of quarantines. 
 

Crown and Anchor level. First time cruisers cancelled first and then gold etc. Unlikely.

Cancel sailing and then open up with reduced cabins available to book. This will generate much frustration.

No easy way to do this. Ideally Royal has kept back some of their lower revenue rooms and will not need to cancel many if capacity limits are in place. However, cash is/was tight and deposits are $$$ regardless of room type.

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15 minutes ago, AlmondFarmer said:

I have not seen a protocol if ships are booked beyond a regulated or self imposed capacity limit at time or sailing.

Thus far, Royal Caribbean plan for this issue has been to cancel and then rebook the cruise. 

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22 minutes ago, AlmondFarmer said:

I have not seen a protocol if ships are booked beyond a regulated or self imposed capacity limit at time or sailing.

With the situation as it currently stands and the unfair attention of the media, I don't see anyway that a cruise line would overbook beyond government mandates.  That would pause everything again for who knows how long and bring continued unfair media attention upon the industry. We all want cruising to get back to normal, but I think it should be looked on as a marathon and not a sprint. 

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@smokeybandit

I recall reading in the CSO that 60% capacity when starting out and then raising it 20% every 30 days. I cannot see why, given the CDC's response, cruise lines would be exempt from capacity limits. We recently had opening day in Chicago for the Cubs and they had capacity limits set. Theme parks, restaurants, airlines and even some retail stores had/have capacity limits. I do think the lines have been booking to 100% capacity, not overbooked but right up there. They need the revenue.

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