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Why don't cruise ships use Murphy Beds?


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I am seeing more and more Hotels using Murphy Beds as the primary bed in the room.  In case you are not familiar with a Murphy Bed, this is a bed attached to the wall that you pull down at night to reveal the bed.  Having a Murphy bed gives you more space during the daytime.

There are now Murphy Beds that are a couch when not folded.  And I have also seen Murphy Beds that are tables during also when not folded.  Visuals below...

I know that the beds in the rooms can be 2 twins.  But I feel more people have them together and the Murphy Bed would be terrific in a smaller room.  Maybe have these as "upgraded" rooms.  I would pay extra for a room like this.

Just a thought.

Who can I sell my idea to?  LOL.

 

 

Yes that couch is a bed!

Riviera Resort Room Photo Tour - Disney Tourist Blog

Twin River Casino Hotel, Lincoln, RI - Booking.com

 

And this is a table with a bed.

This Incredible Murphy Bed Turns Into a Desk or Dining Table When Folded Up

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Disney Cruise Line has Murphy beds, and Royal Caribbean has some beds that come out of the wall or ceiling, but they are more of a bunk bed style than a Murphy. 

I see your point for the main bed though, that would be cool and save a lot of space!

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15 minutes ago, Sharla said:

Disney Cruise Line has Murphy beds, and Royal Caribbean has some beds that come out of the wall or ceiling, but they are more of a bunk bed style than a Murphy. 

I see your point for the main bed though, that would be cool and save a lot of space!

Right!  I would so pay more to have this.  For Interior Rooms.  The bed goes against the back wall.

10 minutes ago, Vancity Cruiser said:

An excellent point. I never thought about it but it makes a ton of sense. I'm sure there is some reason for it. Perhaps durability of murphy beds and the costs associated with maintenance and replacement? 

If Disney can figure it out (durability wise), I am sure RCCL can.  And I have tried them, they use a standard mattress and just as comfortable as a platform bed.

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Key problem is, as you mentioned, the inability to split the bed. This would create restrictions on how a stateroom could be configured. You'd end up with two sub-categories, foldaway bed and conventional beds that can be split. I could see a benefit of this style bed is a studio stateroom.

Next issue I could see is liability. What happens if a guest is injured when trying to pull down or push up the bed? Followed by increasing labor needs to have crew available for setting up the beds on demand.

Good example is what do you if you come back from being out all day and you just want to lie back and relax but the bed had been folded up in the morning. Find out after giving the stateroom attendant a call that it might be 30 minutes or more before someone can come and setup the bed.

On some ships/staterooms the couch is already a Murphy style bed where the bottom section pulls out and leveled. However, this is setup in the evening and put back in place in the morning.

 

Example for a Grand Loft on Anthem. Sorry, don't have any photos handy showing a non-suite stateroom.

Couch during day

20171011212422-646ee580-me.jpg

Couch at night

20171011215631-20acf511-me.jpg
 

I feel a Murphy bed is fine for a secondary bed but not a primary.

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